‘Political Rewind’ replay: The delicate matter of rape on Georgia campuses

Perhaps suffering a slight case of Trump fatigue, today’s cast of GPB’s “Political Rewind” began with a heavy focus on doings in the state Legislature – including state Rep. Earl Ehrhart’s legislation that would require state universities to report cases of sexual assault to local law enforcement authorities.

If you missed it live this afternoon, you can listen to it here now:

Today’s panel: Host Bill Nigut, yours truly and my AJC colleague Kristina Torres

Reader Comments 0

8 comments
Charles Jones
Charles Jones

As an advocate for compassion and fairness for falsely accused young men, I strongly support the bill in question. If you're going to make an accusation that can potentially ruin a young man's life, you need to be prepared to back it up in a system where he has rights too - where he is innocent until proven guilty, has the right to vigorously cross examine, etc. - unlike the campus "judiciary" system.

Brenda Dmytryck
Brenda Dmytryck

End gun free zones.Constitutional carry\U0001f52b\U0001f1fa\U0001f1f8\U0001f609

Andy Young
Andy Young

Keep telling yourself that. More emojis will make it true!

Steve Morris
Steve Morris

Should be law enforcement not campus cops

Ariel Walley
Ariel Walley

Here's the issue though: rape is already drastically underreported to the police because of the intense interviews and multiple retellings of the event. Universities receive training to decide the matter less formally. This bill also prevents the universities from taking action until a decision is reached, which can take a couple years. Meanwhile the potential rapists and possible victim would still be stuck in the same class together and the university can't do anything.

Charles Jones
Charles Jones

When you say "decide the matter less formally," though, you mean decide it without allowing the man to thoroughly and brutally cross-examine the accuser, without allowing him to present evidence in his defense, etc. But the reason that we have these rights in the first place is to get to the truth. Without those rights, "it's not about the truth" as the Duke Lacrosse coach was told (and which is the title of his book). It's just about railroading the young man off campus, guilty or not. I don't think that's right.